VMware Wants To Bury Microsoft's Blue Screen Of Death


 

VMware PEX Microsoft Blue
Screen of Death

 

VMware wants to bury once and for all the dreaded Microsoft Blue Screen of death with the robust VMware software-defined data center product set.

 

In fact, VMware Chief Marketing Officer Rick Jackson Tuesday asked hundreds of VMware partners at the vendor's Partner Exchange Conference in Las Vegas for a "moment of silence," with religious music cued up against a backdrop of a grave marker titled "Blue Screen of Death. Microsoft Corporation. 1975-2013. Highly controversial from the moment it appeared this piece has been known to evoke frustration, anger and even rage in viewers by undermining many hours of work in a single instant."

 

[Related: Microsoft To VMware: Thanks For Confirming You're More Expensive]

"There are some things that just need to be made extinct," said Jackson, referring to the blue screen that signifies a major system error and has come to be regarded as the scarlet letter of computing.

"Who hasn't seen the infamous blue screen of death?" asked Jackson as he rallied partners to simplify IT operations by virtualizing storage, networking and security using the full VMware software-defined data center product set. "Because, you see, this is the current state of the data center. Now the physical appearance of the data center might be cleaned up, but underneath that facade it might as well be a big mess of complexity."

The VMware blue screen of death attack comes with Microsoft stepping up its battle to win share for its HyperV virtualization hypervisor product, which is bundled with Windows Server 2012. Microsoft's view is that Windows Server 2012 and System Center 2012 include all the necessary components for building and running a private cloud. "VMware can read the writing on the wall," said a Microsoft spokesperson in reply to the VMware blue screen of death missive. "We've trumped them on private cloud at a better price and we have a real public cloud to offer customers."

NEXT: VMware's President On Microsoft Vs. VMware